Jonathan MAGEEAge: 7117701841

Name
Jonathan MAGEE
Birth about 1770

Note: The pedigree of Jonathan Magee had been taken from the book MAGEE HISTORIES: THE PROGENITORS AND DE…
Death of a fatherLewis MAGEE
before May 17, 1784 (Age 14)
Note: From “Lewis McGee” file, in “Georgia Headright and Bounty Land Records 1783-1909,” database at familysearch.org. The 17 May 1784 date is the date on which warrant for bounty land was issued to his heirs
MarriageRebecca JAMESView family
November 19, 1793 (Age 23)
Note: The marriage bond was filed in (Augusta) Richmond County Ga, which is on the South Carolina border. The paper states that Rebecca James is an orphan at the time of the marriage in 1793.
Property 1793 (Age 23)
Note: Tax records for in 1793 show that William and Jonathan Magee lived side by side along Sandy Run Creek in southern Richmond Co.

Birth of a son
#1
Evan J MAGEE
about 1794 (Age 24)
Birth of a son
#2
Holden MAGEE
1796 (Age 26)
Birth of a daughter
#3
Elizabeth MAGEE
about 1797 (Age 27)
Death of a motherElizabeth
after January 6, 1800 (Age 30)

Residence 1800 (Age 30)
Note: Jonathan Magee was still living in Richmond Co GA in 1800, according to tax records.
Residence 1802 (Age 32)
Note: Jonathan Magee and relatives evidently moved to southwest Misssissippi before they settled in St Tammany Parish LA. Jonathan and his brother William Magee appear in various tax and census records of Adams Co from 1802 to about 1812. It is likely that the records refer to Jonathan Magee of Richmond Co GA and St Tammany LA because of the timeline and the fact that Richard (and his wife Priscilla James) Burch of Richmond Co GA also appeared in the same records in MS and then LA. Once the Spanish had been driven from Spanish Florida (South Louisiana) many of the American settlers moved south from Mississippi into the land on the North side of Lake Pontchartrain.

Birth of a daughter
#4
Rebecca MAGEE
1803 (Age 33)

Birth of a daughter
#5
Ruth MAGEE
December 17, 1805 (Age 35)

Residence 1805 (Age 35)
Note: Jon Magee is living next to John James in Adams Co MS in 1805.
Birth of a son
#6
Joseph MAGEE
about 1807 (Age 37)

Residence 1809 (Age 39)
Note: Jonathan sold land along the Bogue Chita River in 1809 to James Gwin.
Residence 1810 (Age 40)
Note: Part of Adams Co MS was broken off in the early 1800s to form Franklin Co MS. The 1810 territorial …
Birth of a daughter
#7
Jemina MAGEE
about 1813 (Age 43)
Property
Farm on Bogue Chita River - T1S,R10E Greenburg District
1813 (Age 43)
Note: By 1813 Jonathan Magee was residing on his farm in Township 1S, Range 10E in St Tammany Parish. In 1813 Spanish Florida was incorporated into the US and all residents had their 1813 land claims verified by a US Commission in 1819. Jonathan Magee was certified as the rightful owner of T1S,R10E by the commission, as documents from the LA Land Archives verify.

Military 1814 (Age 44)
Note: It is not known whether this record refers to Jonathan Magee, formerly of Richmond GA, or to his (po…
Marriage of a childEvan J MAGEENaomi SHORTView family
November 26, 1815 (Age 45)
Note: St Tammany LA Parish Marriage bonds: Evin Magee, 20 Nov 1815, to Naomi Short, daughter of Jonas Short.
Marriage of a childSimeon SHORTElizabeth MAGEEView family
December 27, 1815 (Age 45)
Marriage of a childHolden MAGEESarah Mary 'Sally' HowellView family
about 1820 (Age 50)

Census 1820 (Age 50)
Marriage of a childLewis HOWELLRuth MAGEEView family
August 10, 1824 (Age 54)

Marriage of a childWilliam Thomas HUTSONRebecca MAGEEView family
about 1824 (Age 54)
Marriage of a childJoseph MAGEEMahulda FORDView family
about 1827 (Age 57)

Death of a brotherWilliam MAGEE
1827 (Age 57)
Note: 1830 Federal Census, Washington Parish, Louisiana. Mary Magee head of household.
Marriage of a childWilliamm H. PURVISJemina MAGEEView family
about 1830 (Age 60)

Census 1830 (Age 60)
Note: Jonathan was still living close to the Richard Burch family.
Death of a sonEvan J MAGEE
about 1836 (Age 66)
Note: Evans death was chronicled many years later in the Westville News Dated 27 October 1898, which desc…
Death of a sonEvan J MAGEE
about 1836 (Age 66)
Note: Evan Magee was dead by 1837 since his widow's name appeared in the Mississippi census of 1837.
Census 1837 (Age 67)
Note: Jonathan Magee lived next to his son Evan's widow - Naomi SHORT Magee.
Property
Farm in Simpson Co MS
1840 (Age 70)
Address: Township: 2-N Range: 3-E Section: 1
Note: Name: Jonathan Maghee
Census 1841 (Age 71)
Note: Jon Magee, on census just before his death, was living alone. Evidently Rebecca died before Jonathan. Living close by was Jonathan's grandson Nathan Magee and his young family, with wife Caroline MANGUM and sons Evan and William.
Death October 1841 (Age 71)
Note: Estate Notice for Jonathan Magee, Jackson Mississippian, Oct 22, 1841: December 1841 term of the Probate Court, Simpson County MS. Thomas Hutson and William H Pervis, Adms.
Probate 1847 (5 years after death)
Note: The probate of Jonathan Magee's estate lasted for almost a decade. Several newspaper articles annou…
Burial
Family with parents - View family
father
mother
 
Marriage:
-4 years
elder brother
Family with Rebecca JAMES - View family
wife
 
Marriage: November 19, 1793Richmond Co Ga
13 months
son
3 years
son
10 years
daughter
-2 years
daughter
-5 years
daughter
11 years
son
7 years
daughter

Birth

The pedigree of Jonathan Magee had been taken from the book MAGEE HISTORIES: THE PROGENITORS AND DESCENDENTS OF JACOB MAGEE AND MARY SCOTT, by Bevin Creel of Franklinton, LA. His book seems to be the best researched of the Magee histories. Recent discoveries by Mr Creel seem to indicate that, most likely, Jonathan's father was Lewis Magee of Georgia. This is his revised biography of our Jonathan Magee.

Name Jonathan Magee

Birth[1] bef 1770
Marriage bond 19 Nov 1793 Richmond, Georgia, United States to Rebecca James Death[2][3] about 1841 Simpson, Mississippi, United States

The first record of Jonathan Magee is the 7 Nov 1785 entering of land in his name in Richmond County, Georgia by John Smith, his step-father: “John Smith in behalf of the heirs of Jonathan McGee entered two hundred acres of land between Spirit Creek & Mcbean including the long pond” (Richmond County, Georgia Land Court Minutes 1784-1787, 92). I have discussed the parentage of Jonathan under the family page of Lewis and Elizabeth Magee, the parents, and will not repeat those arguments here.

The land court minutes are somewhat misleading, in that they infer that one Jonathan McGee was a deceased adult. However, the warrant issued on the same date shows that the 200 acres were issued to John Smith as “Trustee for Jonathan McGee,” to be laid out between Spirit Creek and McBean [Creek], including “The Long Pond.” (“Georgia Headright and Bounty Land Records 1783-1909,” database at familysearch.org). Therefore, the entry in the land court minutes was not to a deceased man named Jonathan McGee, but to a minor of that name. The lands granted were obtained under the Georgia headright law passed 17 Feb 1783. Under this law, “each head of a family was allowed two hundred acres plus fifty additional acres for each family member or slave, the total amount not to exceed one thousand acres. (Cadle, “Georgia Land Surveying History and Law,” 68). Two hundred acres, then, was the most acreage that a single male could normally receive. Jonathan was still a minor, perhaps just about to come of age in 1785, hence I place his birth at sometime shortly before 1770. The grant for this land was issued 18 July 1787. The land description was for 200 acres bounding “on all sides vacant land” (Register of Grants Book OOO, 32, viewable in “Georgia Headright and Bounty Land Records 1783-1909,” at familysearch.org).

Other Richmond County records relative to Jonathan Magee include the 1793 bond for his marriage to Rebecca James, and the 1795 Richmond County tax digest (viewable at cdm.sos.state.ga.us) showing John Smith paying taxes on his behalf, and on behalf of his brother William.

With respect to brother William, it is important to note that Jonathan and William appear to have shared a very close relationship. They are practically inseparable up until the time of William’s death in the 1820s. These two men removed from Richmond County, Georgia shortly after 1800, settling on Dry Creek near present-day Bude, Franklin County, Mississippi. The Adams County and Franklin County tax returns digitized in the “Mississippi State Archives, Various Records, 1820-1951” database at familysearch.org show them both assessed in this area through the early 1810s. These two men both removed southwestwardly into what would become Louisiana about 1810 or shortly thereafter, where they squatted on land to which they eventually were granted title due to their improvements thereon, under stipulations of a Congressional Act of 1819. These men both obtained title to land in Twp 1 South of Range 10 East of the St Helena Meridian, with Jonathan obtaining Section 58 [one section=640 acres] and William obtaining Sections 39, 40, 41 and 42. These lands are in present-day Washington Parish, along Bogue Chitto River and its tributary, Hays Creek. See the Greensburg Claim Papers, digitized at http://wwwslodms.doa.la.gov/HistoricalDocument. Jonathan also appears to have briefly owned a tract of land on Silver Creek, a tributary of Bogue Chitto, in Washington Parish (St Tammany Parish, LA Deed Bk A-1, 206-7).

After William Magee died in the 1820s (the traditional death year given him is 1827), Jonathan remained in Washington Parish for a few more years. He was shown as head of household there in the 1830 census, aged 60-70. Sometime in 1831 or 1832, he removed to Simpson County, Mississippi, where he was assessed for the first time in the tax return of 1832. There was quite a significant migration of families from Washington Parish, Louisiana and its surrounding areas into the central Mississippi counties of Simpson, Rankin, Hinds, Copiah, etc. during this general time frame. Jonathan followed his sons Evan and Holden into Simpson County. Evan is first found in the 1828 tax return for Simpson, and Holden is first found in the 1829 return. Curiously, neither Jonathan nor any of his boys are assessed with any land in Simpson County during their stay there through the 1830s decade. The last record of Jonathan is his entry in the 1841 Mississippi State Census in Simpson County. He is believed to have died shortly after this time. Neither he nor any of his sons are found in the 1842 tax assessment for Simpson County.

[submitted by: Bevin Creel, 6 July 2012]

References 1 1830 Federal Census, Washington Parish, Louisiana. 2 1840 Federal Census, Simpson County, Mississippi. 3 1841 State Census, Mississippi, Simpson County.

Marriage

The marriage bond was filed in (Augusta) Richmond County Ga, which is on the South Carolina border. The paper states that Rebecca James is an orphan at the time of the marriage in 1793.

Property

Tax records for in 1793 show that William and Jonathan Magee lived side by side along Sandy Run Creek in southern Richmond Co.

Residence

Jonathan Magee was still living in Richmond Co GA in 1800, according to tax records.

Residence

Jonathan Magee and relatives evidently moved to southwest Misssissippi before they settled in St Tammany Parish LA. Jonathan and his brother William Magee appear in various tax and census records of Adams Co from 1802 to about 1812. It is likely that the records refer to Jonathan Magee of Richmond Co GA and St Tammany LA because of the timeline and the fact that Richard (and his wife Priscilla James) Burch of Richmond Co GA also appeared in the same records in MS and then LA. Once the Spanish had been driven from Spanish Florida (South Louisiana) many of the American settlers moved south from Mississippi into the land on the North side of Lake Pontchartrain.

Residence

Jon Magee is living next to John James in Adams Co MS in 1805.

Residence

Jonathan sold land along the Bogue Chita River in 1809 to James Gwin.

Residence

Part of Adams Co MS was broken off in the early 1800s to form Franklin Co MS. The 1810 territorial census of Franklin County, Mississippi Territory, shows William “McGhee” with 1M +21, 6M -21, 1F +21, 2 F -21, no slaves. Next door was Richard Burch with 1, 6, 1, 2, 0. Jonathan McGhee was close by with 1, 3, 1, 3, 0. John James was close with 1M +21, 1F +21 and 6 F -21, and 1 slave

By 1820 Evan James and Richard Burch were living close in Washington Parish LA and Jon Magee had moved to St Tammany Parish.

Property

By 1813 Jonathan Magee was residing on his farm in Township 1S, Range 10E in St Tammany Parish. In 1813 Spanish Florida was incorporated into the US and all residents had their 1813 land claims verified by a US Commission in 1819. Jonathan Magee was certified as the rightful owner of T1S,R10E by the commission, as documents from the LA Land Archives verify.

Military

It is not known whether this record refers to Jonathan Magee, formerly of Richmond GA, or to his (possible) son Jonathan Jr. Some genealogists (in Groveton Tx) claim Jonathan and Rebecca had a son named Jonathan Jr, but I have found no evidence of Jonathan Jr in any records.

NAME: Magee, Jonathan RANK: Private COMPANY: 12 and 13 Cons. Reg't., La. Mil. (Orig. under McGee, Jonathan) Louisiana Soldiers in the War of 1812

Census

Jonathan was still living close to the Richard Burch family.

Census

Jonathan Magee lived next to his son Evan's widow - Naomi SHORT Magee.

Property

Name: Jonathan Maghee Issue Date: 10 Dec 1840 Acres: 38.75 Meridian: Choctaw State: Mississippi County: Simpson Township: 2-N Range: 3-E Section: 1 Accession Number: MS2090__.405

Census

Jon Magee, on census just before his death, was living alone. Evidently Rebecca died before Jonathan. Living close by was Jonathan's grandson Nathan Magee and his young family, with wife Caroline MANGUM and sons Evan and William.

Death

Estate Notice for Jonathan Magee, Jackson Mississippian, Oct 22, 1841: December 1841 term of the Probate Court, Simpson County MS. Thomas Hutson and William H Pervis, Adms.

Probate

The probate of Jonathan Magee's estate lasted for almost a decade. Several newspaper articles announcing probate stages appeared in the Jackson MS newspaper.

The final series of announcements listed heirs and distributees but did not state the family relationships. It appears that the list starts with children of Evan Magee (deceased) and ends with living children of Jonathan. It also seems to have confused the name John Magee with Evan Magee (deceased.) However Evan Magee was also known as Evan J Magee so, perhaps, Evan's middle name was John and was sometimes called John.

To wit: Nathan, Warren, John Magee, Martha Crain, Nariza Townsend are all children of Evan Magee deceased.

Naomi Miles was widow of Evan Magee.

Elizabeth Short, Ruth Howell, Rebecca Hutson, Joseph & Holden Magee, Jemina Pervis were all children of Jonathan Magee.

Note

List or owners of Headrights (Original grantees) in Washington Parish.

Bogue Chitto River North of Franklinton

* James Gwin
* Isaac and William Roberts
* Jacob Alford
* Elisha Roberts
* Woody Jones
* Tom Bickham
* Edmund Hunt
* Jonathan Magee
* William Carter

This is a link to the Washington County Rootsweb site. It has more information on the history of the area and lists of early settlers. Jonathan is listed.

http://www.rootsweb.com/~lawashin/history.html

Note

A tax list was compiled and published in the book "An Index to the 1820 Census of Louisiana's Florida Parishes and 1812 St.Tammany Parish Tax List". Jonathan is listed as:

Mc Gee, Jonathan 1 male, 1 female 7 children 0 slaves

Note

Jonathan evidently moved to St Tammany Parish in Louisiana about 1809. He received headrights (land patent) to acreage close to Boque Chita. He was still in Louisiana in the 1830 census although he was not to be found in the local 1833 census(tax rolls). Jonathan was living in Simpson County MS in the 1840 census. In 1841 Jonathan died in Mississippi leaving a will, according to a newspaper item, but a copy of the will has not been found.

Note

Extract taken from:

THE HISTORY OF WASHINGTON PARISH, LOUISIANA AS COMPILED FROM THE RECORDS AND TRADITIONS BY HON. PRENTISS B. CARTER

Judge 22nd Judicial District Court, Parishes of Washington and St. Tammany,

"THE EARLY SETTLERS OF WASHINGTON PARISH

As to the actual settlers who brought about this condition, it might be well to note that none of a permanent nature appeared earlier than about 1810. The settlements are founded mostly on headrights granted by the Spanish colonial power, issued in the first years of the century shortly prior to the Louisiana Transfer. From a careful examination of the survey made in 1848 and completed in the year 1849, under the heading of "Greensburg District" headrights, it is interesting to not that no land right were made in the "bald piney woods", as the natives term those sections where we see no creeks, branches, or rivers. Instead settlers built their little log homes, and a bit later and oh, so proudly their first "box" or frame homes, along the banks or in the valleys and swamps of the creeks and rivers. Of the families locating in this manner Abner, Thomas and Benjamin Bickham were among the first, coming in 1807. William Brumfield came in 1809; Exediel Brumfield in 1810; Amos, Benjamin and Thomas Richardson located in 1809 and 1810; David and John Mizell (then spelled Measles) in 1812; John Simmons in 1812; William Hays and William McGeehee in 1809 and Jonathan McGeehee in 1812. ........ Among other prominent families in the history of Washington Parish is that of the Magees (formerly spelled McGehee). The name "Magee" has figured extensively in the development of the parish, and the family is today one of the largest in all this region. But few families have no Magee blood in them. These are the descendants of the Magees already mentioned and of Hezekiah Magee who settled in 1808, having been born in Magee's Creek of Pike County, Mississippi, and whose wife, Dicey Magee, was of that vicinity also. ......

ANDREW JACKSON BLAZES THE TRAIL OF THE MILITARY ROAD THROUGH WASHINGTON PARISH IN WAR OF 1812

In the War of 1812, General Jackson led his army along the famous "Military Road" traveling from Tennessee, via Columbia, Mississippi, crossing the River Pearl, through Washington Parish and on through St. Tammany and the site of Covington. Jackson found many creeks and rivers to block his passage, but he built bridges, or forded the shallower creeks. In building these bridges he laid the whole logs crosswise in order to make the bridges stronger, for his army and wagon trains to cross in safety. The loge in the bridge he built over Bogue Loosa Creek at Ben's Ford, which he himself named, are there today in a state of excellent preservation. This Ford is near the present site of the (unreadable) City". The army blazed its trail as itwent, and this trail formerly known at "Road Militaire" formed which is used today, though not extensively. It was at Ben's Ford, and other points in the Pearl River valley, that the men of Washington Parish armed his forces, among them being three of the Bickhams, Hezekiah Magee, and many others. One of the direct descendants of John Bickham, today has the sword he used in the Battle of New Orleans. This Military Road crossed our parish, not only the Creek Bogue Loose, but the creeks Pushpetappy, Muntergrand, Adams, Mitchell and Tally's. "

Note

Record copied from \"Legal Records of Washington Parish, La., 1819-1897, vol 1\" by E. Russ Williams, Jr.

Know all men by these presents that I JONATHAN MAGHEE of Bogus Chitto Dirstrict have bargained sold and delivered unto James Gwin my Labor and improvements bounded South by Joseph Erwin North by Zadok Barrow Lying on the East of Bogue Chitto whichSd improvement in Labor I warrant defend from myself my heirs Executors or assigns given under my hand this 25th day or October 1809. Witness present Jofseph Erwin . his Jonathan x McGhea mark

Note

An alternative possibility for the parentage of Jonathan Magee, taken from www.werelate.org.

ANALYSIS OF THE PARENTAGE OF JONATHAN MAGEE AND WILLIAM MAGEE Submitted by Bevin Creel: April 2012

The 1795 tax digest for Richmond County, Georgia (on p 16, viewable at “Georgia’s Virtual Vault,” http://cdm.sos.state.ga.us) shows one John Smith in “Lyon’s District,” paying taxes both for his own land in that district, as well as for the lands of William “McGee” and Jonathan “McGee.” A comparison of the names in Capt Lyon’s District with abstracted records in Davidson, “Records of Richmond County, Georgia” shows that Capt Lyon and the men in his district lived in the southern section of Richmond County, on and around Spirit Creek and neighboring watercourses.

The sibling relationship of William and Jonathan Magee is undisputed. Their relative ages, common migration pattern (Georgia>Mississippi>Louisiana), and proximity of land holdings testify to their relationship. Their parentage, however, is a difficult research problem. I will take as my starting point the 1795 tax digest for Richmond County, and focus on the questions: (1) How early did William and Jonathan Magee come to live in the area of Spirit Creek?; and (2) what other Magee/McGee men were living in that area during that general time frame who could have been their father? In order to answer these questions, I will begin with a timeline and end with a summary discussion. The reader will note that I use the spellings Magee and McGee quite interchangeably within.

TIMELINE OF RICHMOND COUNTY MAGEES AND ASSOCIATES

16 June 1773—Hugh Magee paid for apprehending and bringing Arthur Lot to Savannah Goal per account dated this date (Candler, “Colonial Records of the State of Georgia,” vol 19, 478).

1779 – Pay Roll of Capt Jeremiah Beall’s company of militia from Richmond County, Georgia, for the period 8 Sept 1779-18 Oct 1779, included Hugh “Megee” and “Luis Megee” (Davis, “Georgia Citizens and Soldiers of the American Revolution,” 92). This company was part of the “Lower Battalion,” covering the southern sections of Richmond County, commanded by Col Robert Middleton. Middleton and his men appear to have joined Gen McIntosh in his march from Augusta to aid the French Admiral d’Estaing’s assault on British occupied Savannah in September-October 1779. The assault was unsuccessful and French and American troops withdrew on 18 Oct 1779 (Coleman, “The American Revolution in Georgia,” 128-9). From a genealogical standpoint, this pay roll places Hugh and Lewis Magee in the southern section of Richmond County during the American Revolution. Richmond County land records for some men in Beall’s company dated immediately after the close of the Revolution confirm this fact. We may cite, for example, that the company Lieutenant, Zephaniah Beall, petitioned for acreage on Spirit Creek in 1785 (National Genealogical Society Quarterly 56:1968, p 287). As a final point here, and to frame the following points, I should underscore that, apart from William and Jonathan Magee (obviously), Hugh and Lewis were the only two Magee/McGee men that I have been able to place in Richmond County from the beginning of the county through 1800.

28 Jan 1780—Hugh McGee appointed to administer the oath of allegiance to the state of Georgia to the inhabitants “of the lower parts” of Richmond County. (Candler, “Revolutionary Records of the State of Georgia,” vol 2, 204-5). On 19 May, he qualified for this office, and also qualified as a Magistrate for Richmond County (idem, 246-7). Deeds for Hugh Magee, cited below, will show that he acquired quite sizeable land holdings in the southern section of Richmond County, along Spirit Creek.

6 July 1780---Hugh McGee named as a “rebel Captain” in the 6 July 1780 act to “disqualify and render incapable the several persons [...] from holding or exercising any office of trust, honour, or profit in the Province of Georgia.” This so-called “Disqualifying Act” was passed by the British after they re-took control of Savannah from the rebelling colonists (White, “Historical Collections of Georgia” (1855), 98-105). Hugh must have made himself particularly odious to the British during the Revolution, since the Disqualifying Act singles out only 151 men, among whom were the most conspicuous leaders of the Georgia patriots, such as the Governor, leading military figures, etc.

22 March 1784—John Twiggs certified that Lewis McGee “is entitled as a refugee to a bounty of land” (“Lewis McGee” file, in “Georgia Headright and Bounty Land Records 1783-1909,” database at familysearch.org). Other papers in the file of Lewis McGee include a petition and a warrant. The petition, undated, from Hugh Magee, “for the heirs of Lewis,” reads “The petition of the heirs of Lewis Magee. Your petrs. pray a warrt. for the within land in Washington County.” I assume by this record that Lewis was dead at this time. The warrant was issued 17 May 1784, to Surveyor for Washington County, Georgia, “to lay out 287 ½ acres in Washington County to Lewis McGee.” The grant for this land was issued 28 Dec 1784, and described the land as being bounded on the northeast by Ogeechee River, southeastwardly by Rheubin Lett’s (Lott’s?) land, on all other sides by vacant lands (Register of Grants Book FFF, 222, viewable in “Georgia Headright and Bounty Land Records 1783-1909,” database at familysearch.org). An image of the survey may be found in Dwyer’s helpful reproduction of the Washington County Plat Book (Dwyer, “Washington County, Georgia Surveyor’s Plat Book A-1784,” 220), showing that the land was adjacent to a tract of Reuben Lett (Lott?). It is important to note that this land was not within the bounds of present-day Washington County. The land fell into Montgomery County upon that county’s formation in 1793 (today, the land is in Emanuel County, which was formed in 1812). A thorough search of Montgomery County deeds failed to show precisely what happened to the land granted to Lewis’s heirs. The only other mention of “Lewis McGee’s” land that I have been able to find is in records associated with the neighboring land of Charles Simmons. Simmons was granted land in 1785 on Ogeechee River bounded by Robert Williams and “Lewis McGee” (Register of Grants Book FFF, 208). Simmons (or Simons) appears to have conveyed this land to John Fenn. When Fenn, in turn, sold the land in 1800, the deed mentioned that the land of “Lewis McGee” adjoined the tract at the time of the original grant (Montgomery County, Georgia Deed Book “CPG,” 372-3). I am of the opinion that the land granted to Lewis McGee’s heirs was sold before Montgomery County was formed off of Washington County in 1793. This is generally supported by the 1797-98 tax digest for Montgomery County, which shows no McGee/Magee men assessed in the county (viewable at Georgia’s Virtual Vault). Unfortunately, the deeds for Washington County are not extant for this time period. Before leaving Montgomery County, Georgia, in the interest of full disclosure, I should point out that there was a William McGee who bought 1,000 acres on the Altamaha River in Montgomery County in 1799, but when he sold the same tract in 1800, he was a resident of the “County of Elbert” (Montgomery County, Georgia Deed Book “CPG,” 278-9). This man was probably the William Magee who made a deed of gift to his adult son “John” in Elbert County in 1808 (Farmer, “Elbert County, Georgia Deed Books K-R, 52, ref to Bk L, 25). I will bracket him from the present discussion.

7 Nov 1785—Richmond County, Land Court, “John Smith in behalf of the heirs of Jonathan McGee entered two hundred acres of land between Spirit Creek & Mcbean including the long pond” (Richmond County, Georgia Land Court Minutes 1784-1787, 92). This record suggests that one Jonathan McGee is deceased, and that John Smith was petitioning the land court on behalf of his heirs. However, this was not the case. The warrant issued on the same date shows that the 200 acres were issued to John Smith as “Trustee for Jonathan McGee,” to be laid out between Spirit Creek and McBean [Creek], including “The Long Pond.” (“Georgia Headright and Bounty Land Records 1783-1909,” database at familysearch.org). Therefore, the entry in the land court minutes was not to a deceased man named Jonathan McGee, but to a minor of that name. The reference to Spirit Creek places Jonathan McGee in the same area of Richmond County as Hugh Magee and Lewis Magee. McBean Creek lies south of Spirit Creek, running parallel to Spirit Creek, and forms the boundary between Richmond and Burke Counties. The lands granted were obtained under the Georgia headright law passed 17 Feb 1783. Under this law, “each head of a family was allowed two hundred acres plus fifty additional acres for each family member or slave, the total amount not to exceed one thousand acres. The applicant received the first two hundred acres free but paid a fee, on a sliding scale, of one shilling to four shillings six pence per acre for each additional acre. Fees for lands were dropped entirely in 1785 but were reinstated in 1831” (Cadle, “Georgia Land Surveying History and Law,” 68). Two hundred acres, then, was the most acreage that a single male could receive. While it is certainly possible that married men with families could have “stopped” at 200 acres, if they were able to obtain larger tracts, it is likely that they did so. I have not found an age stipulation with respect to the headright law, but the fact that John Smith applied for the warrant as trustee of Jonathan McGee infers fairly clearly that Jonathan was still a minor, perhaps just about to come of age. The grant for Jonathan’s land was issued 18 July 1787. The land description was for 200 acres bounding “on all sides vacant land” (Register of Grants Book OOO, 32, viewable in “Georgia Headright and Bounty Land Records 1783-1909,” at familysearch.org).

2 Oct 1786 – Richmond County, Land Court, “William McGee enters two hundred acres of land, to be laid out between Sandy run & McBean Creek on headrights.” (Richmond County, Georgia Land Court Minutes 1784-1787, 124). The grant was issued 25 July 1787. The land description was for 200 acres bounding “on all sides by vacant lands” (Register of Grants Book OOO, 85, viewable in “Georgia Headrights and Bounty Land Records 1783-1909,” at familysearch.org). As in the case of Jonathan McGee, this record places William McGee in southern Richmond County, in close proximity to Hugh Magee and Lewis Magee. For a decent map showing these watercourses, see the 1866 map of Richmond County digitized at Georgia’s Virtual vault, http://cdm.sos.state.ga.us/cdm4/cmf.php. I have been unable to determine what happened to the headrights of William and Jonathan Magee that they obtained in the 1780s in Richmond County. I have scanned every extant Richmond County deed from the formation of the county until 1810, and have found no record of the Magee boys selling their lands. There also was no record of a Sheriff’s sale, etc. Lest there be any doubt, the 1795 Richmond County tax return demonstrates that this land lies within the present-day boundaries of Richmond. The last county formed from sections of Richmond County was Warren County, formed in 1793. Whatever happened to the headrights of William and Jonathan Magee in Richmond County must remain a mystery, for now.

10 Nov 1793- Bond for Jonathan McGee to marry Rebecca James. (Davidson, “Records of Richmond County, Georgia,” 174).

1795—Tax return for Richmond County, p16, shows: Lyon’s District,

        Smith, John, 941 acres pine land, 47.1.-
        ditto for Jonathan McGee, 200 acres pine land, 10.-.-
        ditto for William McGee, 270 ½ acres pine land, 13.10.6

The 1795 assessment is digitized at Georgia’s Virtual Vault, http://cdm.sos.state.ga.us/cdm4/tax.php. I have delayed discussing this John Smith in depth until this entry, which places him paying taxes for both Jonathan McGee and William McGee. On a side note, I can account for how William McGee got 200 acres, but not for the other 70 1/2 acres. At any rate, Jonathan and William were not minors at this time, so that is not the reason why John Smith paid their taxes. I could offer several different explanations why John Smith was paying taxes for William and Jonathan, but whatever the explanation, the tax digest demonstrates a close relationship between these three men. Sidney Holdrege has suggested, and I agree with her conclusion, that John Smith was step-father to these McGee boys. This tax record, coupled with the fact that John Smith was “trustee” for Jonathan McGee in the 7 Nov 1785 land court record cited above strongly suggests (demands?) that the father of William and Jonathan McGee was dead before 7 Nov 1785. Indeed, we have one (and only one) deceased McGee man in the correct area before that date: Lewis McGee, who was dead before 17 May 1784, at which time a land warrant was issued to his unnamed heirs. I conclude, therefore, that Lewis McGee was the father of William and Jonathan McGee.

4 Jan 1800 – John Smith and Elizabeth (x) his wife to George Walker, for $1500, sold tract on which sd Smith now resides, on both sides of Spirit Creek, in two surveys and grants, one in the name of Caleb Cox containing 287 ½ acres, the other in the name of sd Smith containing 500 acres....and according to a resurvey totals 1276 acres; wits. Geo. Allen, Free. Walker, Val. Walker; 6 Jan 1800, Elizabeth (x) Smith relinquished claim to the within; Recorded 8 April 1800. (Richmond County, GA Deed Bk G, 498-500).

9 Jan 1800— (two days after the deed above) John Smith “of Spirit Creek” in Richmond County made his will. The abstracted version reads, in part, “As my living wife before she married me saw fit to secure all her property to her children, I leave her twenty five cents.” He also named three nephews living in Scotland. Executors were Alex. Graham, Edward Primrose, witnesses Holland McTyeire, Seaborn Jones, Lucy Heard. The will was probated 6 Oct 1801 (Gilliam, “Records of Richmond County, Georgia,” 58). The language of the will infers that his present wife had children by a previous marriage. This supports my position that John Smith’s wife Elizabeth was the mother of William and Jonathan Magee.

22 Jan 1801—Deed Hugh Magee of Richmond County to Charles Burch, $500, 200 acres in the fork of Spirit Creek. (Richmond County, Georgia Deed Bk H, 204); same date 22 Jan 1801---Deed Hugh Magee of Richmond County to Edward Burch, for $500, sold 150 acres on Spirit Creek. (Richmond County, Georgia Deed Bk K, 331).

6 March 1804—James Scott, Sheriff of Richmond County, at the suit of Edward Burch against Edward Primrose, Exr. of estate of John Smith decd., sold to Edward Burch (in behalf of Gideon Seely), for $120, tract on Little Spirit Creek containing 287 ½ acres. (Richmond County, Georgia Deed Bk K, 1).

20 July 1805—Deed Hugh Magee of Richmond County to Joseph Ware, for $100, sold tract 1675 acres on Big Spirit Creek. (Richmond County, Georgia, Deed Bk L, 108).

28 Sept 1812—Will of Hugh Magee of Richmond County. Named wife Mary, son William Henry Magee, minor. Probated 6 Sept 1813. (Davidson, “Records of Richmond County, Georgia,” 50).

SUMMARY

At this point, I give the following general reconstruction. Hugh Magee and his close relation Lewis Magee (probably his brother) arrived in Richmond County, Georgia before the American Revolution, and settled in the lower section of the county, in the area of Spirit Creek. They were both active patriots in the Revolution, with Hugh serving as a Magistrate, and both men serving together at least one tour in the local militia under Capt Jeremiah Beal. At some point in the war, probably 1780 or 1781, the encroachment of the British forced these men to flee their homes as refugees. Sometime shortly after their return to Georgia, Lewis Magee died. The warrant for the Revolutionary War bounty land due him was issued 17 May 1784, upon the petition of Hugh Magee on behalf of Lewis’ heirs.

After Lewis Magee died, his widow Elizabeth remarried to John Smith. She married him prior to 7 Nov 1785, when warrant was issued to John Smith as “Trustee” of Jonathan Magee for a headright of 200 acres in the area of Spirit Creek. Jonathan Magee was probably at the cusp of coming of age at the time of the warrant. His brother, William, had already come of age himself when he petitioned for a 200 acre headright on 2 Oct 1786 for land relatively nearby. John Smith paid taxes for both William and Jonathan in 1795.

In closing, I would like to return to the two questions that I posed in paragraph two: (1) How early did William and Jonathan Magee come to live in the area of Spirit Creek?; and (2) what other Magee/McGee men were living in that area during that general time frame who could have been their father? The answer to question (1) is that they were in the area of Spirit Creek at the close of the Revolution, and may have been there for some time before that. The answer to question (2) is that the only two Magee men who I have been able to locate in this area during this time frame were Hugh and Lewis Magee. I think it is fairly obvious that Hugh was not their father. Hugh did not go with William and Jonathan to Mississippi, and he did not name them in his will. The evidence presented herein, however, leads to the fairly strong conclusion that their father was Lewis Magee.

Submitted by Bevin Creel: April 2012 ▼References

↑ Estimated from births of children.
MarriageJonathan Magee/Rebecca James Marriage BondJonathan Magee/Rebecca James Marriage Bond
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Image dimensions: 1,076 × 1,681 pixels
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PropertyWilliam and Jon Magee, 1793 Tax Digest
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File size: 1,226 KB
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PropertyJonathan and William Lived on Sandy Run CreekJonathan and William Lived on Sandy Run Creek
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Image dimensions: 569 × 628 pixels
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ResidenceJonathan Magee, Property Tax Roll, Richmond Ga in 1800Jonathan Magee, Property Tax Roll, Richmond Ga in 1800
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Image dimensions: 2,664 × 2,707 pixels
File size: 455 KB
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ResidenceJonathan Magee and Richard Burch on 1802 Adams Co MS Tax ListJonathan Magee and Richard Burch on 1802 Adams Co MS Tax List
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ResidenceWill Magee, Richard Burch and various James men on 1805 Tax List Adams Co MSWill Magee, Richard Burch and various James men on 1805 Tax List Adams Co MS
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Image dimensions: 6,014 × 5,988 pixels
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ResidenceJon MaGee'S Neighbors 1805 Adams Co TaxJon MaGee'S Neighbors 1805 Adams Co Tax
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Image dimensions: 892 × 462 pixels
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ResidenceJon Magee, Richard Burch, Will Magee and James Families in 1810 living in Franklin Co MSJon Magee, Richard Burch, Will Magee and James Families in 1810 living in Franklin Co MS
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Image dimensions: 3,753 × 6,572 pixels
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PropertyOwnership Map of T1S R10E St Tammany in 1813Ownership Map of T1S R10E St Tammany in 1813
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Image dimensions: 4,384 × 3,151 pixels
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PropertyUS Government Awarded Sec 58 T 1S R 10E to Jonathan Magee
Format: application/pdf
File size: 181 KB
Type: Document
Census1837 Simpson Co Census - Jon and Naomi Magee Families1837 Simpson Co Census - Jon and Naomi Magee Families
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Image dimensions: 2,824 × 2,272 pixels
File size: 1,456 KB
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PropertyUS Land Patent for Jonathan Maghee of Simpson MSUS Land Patent for Jonathan Maghee of Simpson MS
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Image dimensions: 3,168 × 4,980 pixels
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Type: Document
CensusMagees on 1841 Census Simpson Co MSMagees on 1841 Census Simpson Co MS
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Image dimensions: 7,132 × 5,760 pixels
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DeathJackson MS Announcement of Jonathan Magee ProbateJackson MS Announcement of Jonathan Magee Probate
Format: image/jpeg
Image dimensions: 1,264 × 828 pixels
File size: 174 KB
Type: Newspaper
Probate1847 Jackson MS Newspaper Announcement of Jonathan Magee Probate1847 Jackson MS Newspaper Announcement of Jonathan Magee Probate
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Image dimensions: 448 × 929 pixels
File size: 187 KB
Type: Newspaper